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Steve Mancini
KIPP Public Affairs Director
smancini@kipp.org or 415.531.5396.

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One of the nation's largest charter school organizations has announced an ambitious expansion plan to more than double its enrollment in the Los Angeles area over the next six years. KIPP LA now operates 11 schools that serve about 4,000 students; by 2020, the organization wants to grow to 9,000 students in 20 schools. >
One of the nation’s largest charter school organizations is announcing on Wednesday an ambitious expansion plan to more than double its enrollment in the Los Angeles area over the next six years. >
Most people can look back on their high school years and remember at least one teacher who made a big difference in their lives. For 100 kids in Houston, their geometry teacher is making her mark by helping them get out of Texas. >
The national KIPP Foundation, which operates nine schools in the L.A. area, has been awarded the prestigious Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools and a check for $250,000. >
Students rapping about cataracts, the black plague and the solar system is all in a day’s work in a science class taught by Tom McFadden, the self-proclaimed “science rapper.” McFadden, a Stanford grad and Fulbright Scholar, used the hip hop he’s long loved to teach students complicated subjects — creating rap videos with a scientific spin. >
KIPP and several other educational organizations have thrown out the old philosophy of letting students struggle on their own to develop college survival skills. Instead, they are partnering with colleges that promise to show students how to study and help them handle crises with mentors and advisers. >
Across this country today, thousands—perhaps tens of thousands—of stressed-out teenagers have just completed an age-old rite of passage: they took their SATs. For about 1.6 million high school students, it remains a critical step to getting into college. But now, that test that so many of detested—that test is getting an overhaul. Jane Martinez Dowling is with KIPP Academy, a charter school system. >
After five years in office, the plight of black and Latino men and boys has the president's attention. His new initiative hopes to build on the successes of programs like KIPP High School in the Bronx. This year, 100 percent of its seniors have applied to college. >
However, within this dark cloud sparkles a silver lining of top-scoring schools for Latino and under-served students. Specifically, “Broken Promises” points out the success story of Santa Clara County’s KIPP Heartwood Academy, which is bucking trends and reaching kids that for most area schools are the unreachable. >
Schaeffler oversees the network of KIPP charter schools in the city, a system that has grown from 80 fifth-graders in 2001 to 3,600 students in neighborhoods that include Anacostia, Shaw and Trinidad. That number sounds small, but if you could calculate which of the three school leaders is most responsible for boosting the number of college-ready D.C. students from tough neighborhoods, my money would be on Schaeffler. >
KIPP Academy Middle School in the South Bronx is different. The school opened a few blocks from Yankee Stadium in 1995, long before the "charter boom" and political backlash. It was one of the first two schools started by Teach for America alumni Dave Levin and Mike Feinberg. >
...The expansion is the result of an unusual tactic that the network once known as the Knowledge Is Power Program has developed to help its students get into and through college. Starting in October 2011, KIPP and college leaders signed pledges to create recruiting pipelines and campus support systems for students who often lack the higher-education connections routinely found in affluent communities. >
In a Mathematica Policy Research study of schools run by KIPP, one of the country’s best-known charter operators, researchers found that on average, students who had been enrolled in KIPP middle schools for three years had test scores that indicated they were about 11 months — or the equivalent of more than a full grade level — ahead of the national average in math. In reading, KIPP’s advantage over the national average was smaller, about eight months. >
A new report finds that students in KIPP charter schools experience significantly greater learning gains in math, reading, science, and social studies than do their peers in traditional public schools. The study, which analyzed data from 43 middle schools run by KIPP, officially known as the Knowledge Is Power Program, was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research, a research center based in Princeton, N.J. >
As charter schools enter their third decade, the advocates who created them still wonder whether they're living up to their promise. A study released on Wednesday suggests some may be on the right track. The study, conducted by independent research firm Mathematica, is the most rigorous research showing that the Knowledge Is Power Program, an acclaimed national chain of charter schools, provides a significant learning boost to middle school students in multiple subjects. >
A Princeton-based research firm's analysis of the KIPP national network of charter schools found KIPP middle-school students made substantial gains in core subjects over a three-year span. Mathematica Policy Research was scheduled to release a report Wednesday based on what it called its "most rigorous large-scale evaluation of KIPP charter schools." >
A seven-year, $4 million study of the KIPP charter school system shows that students make an average of 11 months more academic progress by the end of middle school than their peers at traditional middle schools. The study, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and funded by grants, shows that in most ways KIPP middle school students are identical to their counterparts at typical middle schools. >
KIPP, previously known as the Knowledge Is Power Program, has had more success than any other large educational organization in raising the achievement of low-income students, both nationally and in the District. But many good educators, burned by similarly hopeful stories in the past, have wondered whether KIPP were for real. >
The Knowledge Is Power Program, or KIPP, is a nationwide charter school network whose "no excuses" model and high academic performance have brought it widespread praise. Critics, however, have questioned whether KIPP schools' academic showing is partly attributable to attrition of low-performing students whose seats often end up going unfilled. >
Lifestyles Magazine - "KIPP KIPP Hooray!"
By Nancy A. Ruhling | February 1, 2013
Outside each glass-walled conference room, there’s a sign the size of a sheet from a schoolchild’s notebook. Zest. Grit. Self-Control. Social Intelligence. Gratitude. Optimism. Curiosity. These are the inspiring words that the kids enrolled in the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP), America’s largest, and arguably the most successful, nonprofit charter school network, live and study by. >
Education Next -- “‘No Excuses’ Kids Go to College”
By Robert Pondiscio | February 1, 2013
The C in linguistics proved to Rebecca Mercado that college was going to be different. “It was the first time I had ever received a grade lower than a B, and it was upsetting,” admits Mercado, a biochemistry and cell biology major at the University of California, San Diego. >
Houston's urban school leaders vowed Wednesday to continue efforts to expand quality school choices, despite financial and regulatory challenges. >
Charter schools throughout the country are coping with myriad challenges in preparing for the Common Core State Standards, an effort that could force them to make adjustments from how they train their teachers to the types of curriculum they use to the technology they need to administer online tests. >
In a study conducted by The Hamilton Project, researchers examined 35 New York City charter schools to learn which educational practices distinguished high-achieving schools from low-achieving schools. >
Charter school operator KIPP DC is among 16 winners of the federal government’s Race to the Top District grant competition, U.S. Department of Education officials announced Tuesday. >

Results 1 - 25 of 98